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Author Topic: Fake Social Media Popularity  (Read 599 times)
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windsor2
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« on: August 16, 2018, 03:49:51 am »

Selling fake social media popularity is a very big business
The internet has brought new meaning to the old adage, “Don’t believe everything you read.”
From fake news and fake Twitter accounts to fake Instagram followers and fake Amazon reviews, the online world is awash with forgery.
The digital platforms that have come to dominate our online lives like Google and Facebook have spawned new incentive structures which users are quick to corrupt or manipulate for their own gain.
When likes, followers and views can be monetized, essentially becoming their own kind of currency, it doesn’t take long before counterfeiters move in.
An investigation by The New York Times has revealed just how much money can be made from delivering such innocuous things as fake YouTube views.
One Canadian man, Martin Vassilev, has made $200,000 in 2018 alone after selling about 15 million phony views to users on the popular video-sharing site.
His company — called 500views — promises to boost organic traffic to customers’ videos by delivering a bunch of fake views that will boost their appeal and rankings in search results.
“Have you ever wondered why musicians buy YouTube views? How do most musicians become famous on YouTube? We can help you achieve fame,” his website tells visitors.
Unlike so-called click farms where rooms of poorly paid workers in developing countries manually click on links, subscribe to accounts or watch videos, Vassilev’s company connects customers with services which generate views by computers, not humans.
His business — which also sells fake Instagram followers — harnesses the power of automated systems to generate YouTube Views, likes, comments and subscribers.
“I can deliver an unlimited amount of views to a video,” Vassilev said in an interview with The Times.
Inflating views violates YouTube’s terms of service. But according to Vassilev, while Google does crack down on the shady practice, the difficult game of cat-and-mouse means such services will likely continue to exist.
“They’ve tried to stop it for so many years, but they can’t stop it. There’s always a way around,” he told the Times.
Ironically, a Google search turns up plenty of companies offering up fake YouTube audiences — and it’s no wonder given the huge amount of money that can be made.
“I really couldn’t believe you could make that much money online,” Vassilev said, who claims he went from welfare to buying a house and a BMW 328i in 18 months after he started selling YouTube views.
Given the immense size of the video platform, it’s not surprising that there are those who want to manipulate or exploit the service for profit. After all, there’s nothing illegal about it.
According to the latest figures, about 300 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute and almost 5 billion videos are watched on YouTube every single day. Fake activity is bound to slip through YouTube’s fraud detection measures.
“We take any abuse of our systems, including attempts to artificially inflate video view counts, very seriously,” a YouTube spokesperson told News.com.au.
“For well over a decade, YouTube has built, deployed and invested in proprietary technology to prevent the artificial inflation of video view counts. We also periodically audit and validate the views videos receive and, when appropriate, remove fraudulent views and take other actions against infringing channels.”
A pretty large industry has popped up around the fake economy of the internet. Wannabe social media influencers can purchase phony followers — one online tool is selling 1,000 “quality” followers for $10, which seems to be about the going rate.
Meanwhile, other companies offer services claiming to protect brands that hire influencers by providing a way to uncover accounts that have fake followers.
A quick online search and you can also find companies willing to sell you SoundCloud plays as well as Spotify followers and song plays on the major music streaming platform.
If you want to look popular online, there’s someone willing to sell you the mirage.
Services such as these show how the incentives and reward structures created by tech companies have led to a perverse kind of fakery.
Most famously, groups of young men in Macedonia used social media to spread fake and completely sensationalist political news stories in America. Fake news tends to spread much quicker than genuine news and the teens were able to profit from the traffic via automated advertising engines, like Google’s AdSense.
While that particular industry involves humans (for now) to write the fake stories, when automated systems do the heavy lifting, it can make up a significant portion of online activity.
At one point in 2013, YouTube had as much traffic from bots masquerading as people as it did from real human visitors, the company once said.
Another tech giant that has faced troubles with bots is Twitter. The social media company recently cracked down on suspect accounts, causing Donald Trump to lose more than 300,000 followers as fake accounts were purged. But CEO Jack Dorsey is quick to point out that not all bots are bad, as there is plenty of automated activity on these platforms that provide useful and helpful functions.
Many of the fake YouTube services investigated by The New York Times were able to deliver on their promise of views within a week or two.
A member of YouTube’s Fraud and Abuse team told the publication that while only a tiny fraction of fake views get through each day, millions will still inevitably get through.
“View count manipulation will be a problem as long as views and the popularity they signal are the currency of YouTube,” the team said.
https://nypost.com/2018/08/14/selling-fake-social-media-popularity-is-a-very-big-business/
I think exposing this by actually being a part of it is what Harry’s being doing with this crazy stuff with the Meghan/Markle’s situation. People, young and older are being taken in by fake social media accounts and influencers without realizing that they’re being lied to and manipulated into buying expensive stuff and following vapid people.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2018, 03:58:39 am by windsor2 » Logged

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Ariel
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« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2018, 05:01:30 am »

I think he fell victim of it, thinking that he met this huge star ad influencer. If Megan didn't close her twitter it will be interesting how many followers would have been cut from her large following.
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windsor2
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« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2018, 01:32:05 am »

Reality TV stars probed over sneaky online ads: Watchdog investigates Instagram and Twitter stars for plugging products without making it clear they are being paid
Social media celebrities are being investigated over claims they are making millions from hidden advertising plugs in online posts.
Reality TV stars are allegedly using Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter to push products without making clear they are being paid by companies in cash or freebies.
The Competition and Markets Authority has written to celebrities and social media influencers to gather more information about posts and business agreements with brands.
It refuses to say who it is speaking to, but they are likely to include reality TV stars already criticised by the Advertising Standards Authority for not making clear posts are ads.
These include Made In Chelsea’s Millie Mackintosh who uploaded a video advertising a Britvic drink, and another star of the show, Louise Thompson, who plugged a Daniel Wellington designer watch.
It ruled against a tweet by TV presenter AJ Odudu that featured a photo of an Alpro dessert describing it as one of her favourite snacks without acknowledging she was being paid to promote it.
The CMA said: ‘Online endorsements from celebrities and influencers can help brands reach target audiences and boost sales.
‘Where influencers are paid or rewarded to promote, review or talk about a product in their social media feeds, consumer protection law requires that this must be made clear.’
The Advertising Standards Authority expects stars to make clear when they are being paid for an endorsement but there are no clear guidelines. Sometimes advert posts are identified with the hashtags #spon or #sp, but there are concerns people do not understand what they mean or overlook them.
The CMA’s George Lusty said: ‘Social media stars can have a big influence on what their followers do and buy.
‘If people see clothes, cosmetics, a car, or holiday being plugged by someone they admire, they might be swayed into buying it.
‘So it’s really important they are clearly told whether a celebrity is promoting a product because they have bought it themselves – or because they have been paid or thanked in some way by the brand.’
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6069183/Social-media-stars-investigated-plugging-products-without-making-clear-paid.html
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windsor2
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Harryite #21


« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2018, 01:51:09 am »

Melania will share a platform with social media giants to address cyberbullying – after her husband used Twitter to call Omarosa a 'dog'
In what could be a high-frequency signal to her husband, First Lady Melania Trump will attend a summit Monday on cyberbullying, among her signature causes
The summit, the sixth gathering of a federal cyberbullying prevention group, sill include reps from a group of social media platforms.
'Mrs. Trump will deliver brief remarks addressing the positive and negative effects of social media on youth - a key issue of her Be Best campaign,' according to a statement from her office.
'The First Lady will also attend a panel discussion with representatives from multiple social media platforms.' The statement did not list the companies by name. The event will only be covered by a press 'pool' – which restricts media to a small group.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6067993/Melania-share-platform-social-media-giants-address-cyberbullying-dog-tweet.html
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Ariel
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« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2018, 04:46:13 pm »

^ I'd say - whatever's happening between Trump and Melania, they should sort it out amongst themselves. I'm getting tired of the first lady showing her marital discords and disagreement with Donald via jackets, speeches, pantsuits, watching CNN on AF1. C'mon. We're the 21st century - if you don't like the person you're married to: file for a divorce, don't put up public displays as if you're 5 years old.

^^Soooooo.... how far along are we on a probe on Megan and her sneaky online ads? Asking for a friend with popcorn who wants to know when to pop it for the show easter-wink
« Last Edit: August 17, 2018, 04:47:57 pm by Ariel » Logged
windsor2
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« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2018, 11:42:01 pm »

Fools rush in? Relationship guru warns against the celebrity trend for getting engaged weeks after falling in love - and says fad is fuelled by millennials' need for 'instant gratification'
Celebrity couples are fuelling the trend for getting engaged after just weeks
Bollywood star Priyanka Chopra and singer Nick Jonas announced their engagement on Saturday after just three months of dating
Ariana Grande and Pete Davidson spoke about marriage after their first date
Justin Bieber and Hailey Baldwin waited just a month after rekindling romance  
Sheela Mackintosh-Stewart issues a stark warning about micro-engagements
Sheela believes the trend can be attributed to millennials living in a culture of 'instant gratification' and is being fuelled by social media.  thumbsup

A thoroughly modern phenomenon
Commenting on the craze, Sheela told MailOnline Femail: 'Today we very much live in a culture of instant gratification where people, and millennials in particular, want everything immediately.
'They have grown up in a world where all their wants and needs are quite literally met instantly, and where their patience has never really been tested.
'A quick engagement works to cement their love and commitment to each other in the public eye. It also feeds the media frenzy by grabbing the headlines to keep them relevant in pop culture.'  thumbsup

How social media encourages PDAs and ‘ring reveals’
'Undoubtedly social media plays a massive role. Before the digital age, relationships used to be relatively private affairs, but now they are on public display for the world to see and comment on -and the grander the gesture, whether it is PDA’s or gifts, the better.
'Celebrity couples have turned posting cleverly created pictures of themselves and their ‘coupledom’ into an art form generating vast amounts of engagement globally, instead of treating their show of love as special personal moments.

A growing trend
'This summer, we have seen a plethora of celebrity engagements including Ariana Grande to Pete Davidson, and Priyanka Chopra to Nick Jonas, both couples dating for just a few months before getting engaged. Yet, marriage overall is on the decline.
'I believe that often they don’t spend time to take stock, instead they want things, including their whirlwind romances, to speed up so they can press on with their future together, instantly!

Why the 'shine' rubs off when familiarity sets in
'A short engagement clearly works for some, for example George Clooney and Amal Alamuddin got engaged after just six months of courtship and appear to be happily married. However, I am not a strong believer in short engagements.
'The shine then comes off after a few months as familiarity sets in and one’s true character and personality starts to come through.  tehe Meg and Harry.

Why whirlwind romances tend NOT to work
'I find that the honeymoon phase of such celebrity marriages tend to lose their shine roughly after a year, as one’s real character and personality traits, often masked in the early days, inevitably shine through.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-6067777/Relationship-expert-reveals-truth-micro-engagement.html
This aplies to Harry and Meg since most of their relationship was long distant and he engagement and wedding was rushed.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2018, 11:49:23 pm by windsor2 » Logged

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