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Author Topic: The finances of the Dutch RF  (Read 8723 times)
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Countess of Holland
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« on: February 14, 2015, 09:58:45 am »

At the topic on the Spanish King and Queen the finances of the Dutch royals came up (by me when I compared it to the income of the Spanish King). Since it would be OT to discuss it there any further, I decided to start a new topic here.

The finances of the Dutch RF are pretty transparent...now. It took the Dutch parliament several years to get to where we are now. For years, costs of the monarchy were 'hidden' in the budgets of several departments;
* the Department of Defense paying for the royal plane
* the Department of Traffic & Infrastructure paying for the cars and poststamps (since the Dutch Mail resorted under this department)
* the Department of Housing paying for the maintenance of the royal residencies
* the Department of General Affairs paying for the RVD who is responsible for all communications from the government, including communications relating to the RF; there is no separate royal press-office
* the Department of Internal Affairs paid all the security costs (the police resorts under this department)
* the Department of Foreign Affairs picked up the tap for outgoing state visits and part of the incoming state-visits

Now, it is more centered so it is more clear what the overall cost is.

And then there is the royal income.
According to the Constitution there are 6 royals eligible for a state-income:
* The former monarch & his/ her consort
* The King and Queen (or the Queen and Prince-Consort)
* The heir and his/ her consort once the heir has turned 18

So right now, the only royals who get a state-income are former Queen Beatrix, the King and the Queen. In 2021, Princess Amalia will receive an income as well.

The income of the royals is the sum of two components;
1. their private income
2. money they use to pay their staff and the household

In 2015, the King receives a private income of 823.000 euro's. He also received almost 4.5 million to pay his household (secretaries, Lord Chamberlain, Royal Treasurer, Master of Ceremonies, Master of the Stables etc).
The Queen received 326.000 in private income and 585.000 for her staff (private secretaries and reimbursements for costs made to the Mistress of the Robes and her Ladies in Waiting; who don't receive and income by the way).

Princess Beatrix receives 465.000 in private income and another 965.000 for her staff like her secretaries. The princess is still very active and represents her son both nationally and internationally (like this week when she represented The Netherlands at the funeral of former German president Richard Freiherr von Weiszäcker.

Other members of the Royal House get reimbursed by the King for costs made when representing the RF. The only members of the RH who are eligible for such reimbursements are the King's brother and his wife (Constantijn and Laurentien) and the King's aunt and her husband (Margriet and Pieter).
Other relatives of the King are members of the Royal Family but will not represent the country and will thus not receive any state-income directly or indirectly. Only possible exception could be Prince Maurits, eldest son of Princess Margriet but that is because the King named him a royal adjudant not long after his accession to the throne. But I doubt much costs are involved in this.

Anyway, compared to the Spanish King, the Dutch King is well taken care of by the Dutch state. And Queen Maxima has her own income, unlike Queen Letizia.
The latter is a result of the troubles that arose with Prince Hendrik, greatgrandfather of the present King and husband of Queen Wilhelmina. He was totally dependent of his wife, especially after 1918 when his own family lost the throne of Mecklenburg. And this dependency led to very tense relations between the Queen and her husband.
So when Princess Juliana married Bernhard in 1937, Queen Wilhelmina 'lobbied' very hard with the government for her son-in-law to have his own income. And so it was established that spouses of the monarchs receive their own income.

In this respect the Dutch RF stands out, because I don't think other royal spouses receive their own income directly from the state. Not in Scandinavia, not in Belgium (the widowed Queen Fabiola did receive her own apanage I think) and not in Spain or the UK.
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Little light
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« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2015, 11:20:17 pm »

You know I joined this forum for a bit of a laugh, but I have learnt so much historically too. 

thank you poster and Mods.  thankyou You are expanding my knowledge considerably.
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Alexandrine
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« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2015, 09:20:35 pm »

So you can go online and check what they spend on everything? Or it's just well we get this money and this is enough info for the pleb?
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« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2015, 10:29:34 am »

You can go online and see the amounts the royals get. It is part of Chapter 1 of the State Budget.

You won't find out the amount of money Maxima pays on dresses or what they spend on the education of the Princesses. That is all part of 'private income'.

What you can find is a sum up of all costs that were in the past 'hidden' in the budgets (as in, other chapters of the State Budget) of other Departments.

So for example:
* Payments to staff working for the Royal House: 17 million euro's (for 2015); this is cut-up between several services, like the Military House, the Cabinet of the King (who is responsible for the commnunication with the government)
* Price of Material used by the Royal House; 8.4 million (this includes f.e. new cars, maintenance of the palaces that are state-owned, like the work-palace Noordeinde)
* Expenses paid for management of fauna; 290.000 euros a year for the maintenance of the Royal Domains in Apeldoorn
* Expenses for air transportation: 893.000 euro's This is the use of the governmental plane, helicopters etc

It is in Dutch, but perhaps Google translate can translate the gest of it:
http://www.rijksbegroting.nl/2015/voorbereiding/begroting,kst199417_2.html
And f.e. when it comes to the use of the royal plane; it is budgetted that the plane will be used for 75 hours in 2015. They will use helicopters of the the DoD for 50 hours.
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« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2015, 07:48:41 pm »

That's super neat! But they still hide most of their costs except you can have a much better vision of what they really spend.

So they get personal income and they are supposed to pay representation costs (like clothes) from that?
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« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2015, 08:22:43 pm »

The income the royals have, has two components;
A. the private income (the lower number) and this is for regular costs, like clothes, the education for the kids, the tennis, ballet etc for the children, their clothes, the furniture for the private apartments/ house
B. The income for representational costs; this is mostly to pay for the private secretaries but also to pay the other members of the RH who may represent the King. So when f.e. the King's brother has a royal function, he gets reimbursed for his costs by his brother. This can be travelling costs (from Brussels, where he lives) for example. The money is also for members of the King's Court, like the Lord Chamberlain, the Master of Ceremony etc. And Maxima's B-component is to reimburse her Ladies in Waiting (since this is an honorary position, they don't get a regular income).

The difference between the people who get their income from the income of the King and the rest of the staff is that people who are paid out of the B-component 'receive their orders directly from the King or are in the direct vicinity of the King' as the State Budget states.
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« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2015, 05:09:39 pm »

So WA/M get A and you know how much they get but that's it? You don't even know if they also get income from the budget?
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« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2015, 08:26:37 pm »

The don't get income from the rest of the budget but they do benefit from the rest of the budget; the costs for the governmental plane, the maintenance of the palaces where they live and work, the maintenance of the Royal Hunting Domain.

In the Netherlands, the budget is rather meticulously controlled and audited by the Audit Chamber (which is one of the three most important Advisory Bodies of the government). Now the Audit Chamber does not control the expenses of the King from his private budget, just like they don't control how any regular civil servant spends his/ her income.
But they do control and audit the use of the plane, if budget that was designated for the hiring of staff was indeed used for that cause etc.

And several political parties in the Dutch parliament are always very strict when it comes to the budget, especially that of the Royal House. So I can say, with a 90% certainty, that apart from the A-component, the King and Queen don't get any more private income from the Dutch government. If the, already very generous, income isn't enough, they can always dip into the inheritance/ trust funds the King has received from his grandparents/ father. I think that the King's personal fortune will be higher than what William and Harry inherited from their mother.
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Tpearl
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« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2015, 03:00:32 am »

Interesting.
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simplyme
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« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2015, 05:58:20 am »

At the topic on the Spanish King and Queen the finances of the Dutch royals came up (by me when I compared it to the income of the Spanish King). Since it would be OT to discuss it there any further, I decided to start a new topic here.

The finances of the Dutch RF are pretty transparent...now. It took the Dutch parliament several years to get to where we are now. For years, costs of the monarchy were 'hidden' in the budgets of several departments;
* the Department of Defense paying for the royal plane
* the Department of Traffic & Infrastructure paying for the cars and poststamps (since the Dutch Mail resorted under this department)
* the Department of Housing paying for the maintenance of the royal residencies
* the Department of General Affairs paying for the RVD who is responsible for all communications from the government, including communications relating to the RF; there is no separate royal press-office
* the Department of Internal Affairs paid all the security costs (the police resorts under this department)
* the Department of Foreign Affairs picked up the tap for outgoing state visits and part of the incoming state-visits

Now, it is more centered so it is more clear what the overall cost is.

And then there is the royal income.
According to the Constitution there are 6 royals eligible for a state-income:
* The former monarch & his/ her consort
* The King and Queen (or the Queen and Prince-Consort)
* The heir and his/ her consort once the heir has turned 18

So right now, the only royals who get a state-income are former Queen Beatrix, the King and the Queen. In 2021, Princess Amalia will receive an income as well.

The income of the royals is the sum of two components;
1. their private income
2. money they use to pay their staff and the household

In 2015, the King receives a private income of 823.000 euro's. He also received almost 4.5 million to pay his household (secretaries, Lord Chamberlain, Royal Treasurer, Master of Ceremonies, Master of the Stables etc).
The Queen received 326.000 in private income and 585.000 for her staff (private secretaries and reimbursements for costs made to the Mistress of the Robes and her Ladies in Waiting; who don't receive and income by the way).

Princess Beatrix receives 465.000 in private income and another 965.000 for her staff like her secretaries. The princess is still very active and represents her son both nationally and internationally (like this week when she represented The Netherlands at the funeral of former German president Richard Freiherr von Weiszäcker.

Other members of the Royal House get reimbursed by the King for costs made when representing the RF. The only members of the RH who are eligible for such reimbursements are the King's brother and his wife (Constantijn and Laurentien) and the King's aunt and her husband (Margriet and Pieter).
Other relatives of the King are members of the Royal Family but will not represent the country and will thus not receive any state-income directly or indirectly. Only possible exception could be Prince Maurits, eldest son of Princess Margriet but that is because the King named him a royal adjudant not long after his accession to the throne. But I doubt much costs are involved in this.

Anyway, compared to the Spanish King, the Dutch King is well taken care of by the Dutch state. And Queen Maxima has her own income, unlike Queen Letizia.
The latter is a result of the troubles that arose with Prince Hendrik, greatgrandfather of the present King and husband of Queen Wilhelmina. He was totally dependent of his wife, especially after 1918 when his own family lost the throne of Mecklenburg. And this dependency led to very tense relations between the Queen and her husband.
So when Princess Juliana married Bernhard in 1937, Queen Wilhelmina 'lobbied' very hard with the government for her son-in-law to have his own income. And so it was established that spouses of the monarchs receive their own income.

In this respect the Dutch RF stands out, because I don't think other royal spouses receive their own income directly from the state. Not in Scandinavia, not in Belgium (the widowed Queen Fabiola did receive her own apanage I think) and not in Spain or the UK.

Thanks so much,really interesting
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