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Author Topic: George III and Queen Charlotte  (Read 1205 times)
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Black Queen
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« on: December 10, 2011, 04:13:19 pm »

http://people.virginia.edu/~jlc5f/charlotte/charlotte.html
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More than two hundred years ago a young princess named Sophie Charlotte, from the tiny German principality of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, played a prominent, though reticent, role on the stage of European world history. As Queen of Great Britain and consort of George III she became an eye witness of a turbulent age. During the reign of George III (1760-1820) Great Britain developed into a far-reaching empire by colonizing Australia, New Zealand, and India, and conquering Canada and the West Indies. However, this empire also suffered the loss of the American colonies (1776) and the tremors of the French Revolution (1789), and countered Napoleon's threatening advances with the victories at Trafalgar (1805) and Waterloo (1815).

How informative it would have been for future generations if Queen Charlotte had described the events of her time and her environment in the candid way of Liselotte von der Pfalz, or in the elegant style of Madame de Sévigné. The only private writings that have survived are Queen Charlotte's 444 letters to her closest confidant--her older brother, Charles II (1741-1816), Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. There are, though, interesting contemporary reports about life at the Court of St. James's from which can be gleaned a sympathetic personal portrait of the Queen from Mecklenburg-Strelitz.

Princess Sophie Charlotte was born on May 19, 1744--the eighth child of the Prince of Mirow, Charles Louis Frederick, and his wife, Elisabeth Albertina of Saxe-Hildburghausen. In 1752, when she was eight years old, Sophie Charlotte's father died. Adolf Frederick III, reigning duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, who had founded the city of Neustrelitz in 1733, died in the same year. His successor was Sophie Charlotte's brother, Adolf Frederick IV, who under the name of "Dörchläuchting" has become an immortal figure in Low German literature through the writings of Fritz Reuter. In August of 1761, he and Sophie Charlotte's dying mother signed the marriage contract with the British King George III of the House of Hanover. At the age of 22, the King had chosen the 17-year-old Strelitz princess as his bride.

This marriage contract, written in Latin, contained the following conditions: The young princess should leave for Great Britain immediately, join the Anglican church and be married according to Anglican rites, and never ever involve herself in politics. She fulfilled all three demands to the fullest satisfaction of her king and consort.

Sophie Charlotte left her Mecklenburg homeland eight days after her mother's death, never to return. She travelled for three days in a triumphal procession to Stade in the Hanoverian kingdom. On August 28, 1761, she boarded the splendidly appointed yacht "Royal Charlotte" at Cuxhaven at the North Sea. During the stormy ten-day voyage which rendered her five ladies-in-waiting unfit for service, the young royal bride comforted herself with singing and playing the harpsichord. She played the national anthem of Great Britain, "God save the King," and memorized a few English sentences--English had not been taught at the court of Neustrelitz.

Mademoiselle Seltzer and Madame de Grabow, a native of Güstrow who was also known as the "German Sappho," had instructed the princesses in the German, French, and Italian languages and literatures as well as in geography. Map making had been of special interest. The fine arts of dancing, drawing, singing, and the playing of musical instruments had not been neglected. Delicate embroidery was a daily and diligent pursuit. The Lutheran theologian Gentzmer taught the ducal children the basics in religion, natural philosophy, mineralogy, and botany. His pains were amply rewarded. His famous pupil later received the honorary title of "Queen of Botany" from the British people because of her great interest in the enlargement and support of the Royal botanical gardens at Kew. In 1773, Sir Joseph Banks, then director of Kew Gardens, named the exotic "Bird of Paradise" plant from the Cape of Good Hope Strelitzia Reginae in honor of his Queen.

When George III first received his young bride on September 9, 1761, at the garden gate of St James's Palace, he was supposedly taken aback by her lack of beauty. It became evident, though, that the pious and modest Strelitz princess soon conquered his heart and willingly submitted to his strong influence over her. Life at the British court was anything but easy for her with a domineering German mother-in-law, Princess Augusta of Wales, and her [Charlotte's] lady-in-waiting Juliane von Schwellenberg, who came with the princess from Mecklenburg-Strelitz and who wanted to protect her young charge at all costs. Nicknamed "Schwelly," von Schwellenberg soon became the laughing-stock of the British people.

In the first twenty-one years of her marriage Queen Charlotte gave birth to fifteen children - nine sons and six daughters. In contrast to most European Royal houses George III and Charlotte had a harmonious marriage. However, during their lifetimes the British court had the reputation of being the dullest in all of Europe because of their notoriously frugal, plain, and pious life-style. Their charities, however, were legend. Hospitals such as the famous Queen's Lying-in Hospital in London which was founded by Charlotte, orphanages, "decayed" musicians, and untold poor families could rely on their munificent patronage. Eight-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart happily fulfilled Queen Charlotte's request and dedicated his Opus 3 to her. When her court musician and music teacher Johann Christian Bach (also called the "London Bach") died of consumption, she paid for his funeral and established a pension for his widow.

In 1788, a shadow fell on the happiness of the Royal family. It became evident that George III had started his slow and violent descent into the madness which medical authorities believe to have been caused by the inherited malady porphyria. His suffering lasted for thirty years until his death in 1820. The Royal Marriage Act, pushed through Parliament by George III in 1772, placed another heavy burden on his family. It stipulated that none of his descendants could marry before the age of twenty-five without the King's consent, and even then they might only marry Protestant princes or princesses. The result of this rather strange law was that his children sought refuge in secret marriages and illicit love affairs or stayed unmarried. Queen Charlotte's court in later years was also called "The Nunnery."

In 1790, the queen bought her last residence--"Frogmore House"--a small country palace located one-half mile southwest of Windsor Castle. She called this beloved home of her old age her "little paradise" where she could study her favorite subject botany and find peace from the constant disturbance caused by her consort's illness. Her oldest son George, Prince of Wales, finally was named regent in 1812, at the age of fifty and, in 1820, upon the death of his father, ascended the throne as George IV, King of Great Britain and Ireland, and Hanover. The "regency of the person" of the ill king George III remained in the hands of his loyal Queen Charlotte until her death on November 17, 1818, at Kew Palace.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlotte_of_Mecklenburg-Strelitz



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Mada
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« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2011, 07:42:30 pm »

I really enjoyed reading that article. Queen Charlotte (she shares my mum's name) was a person with great qualities. I really likes her and the fact she loved John Sebastian Bach (my favourite baroque musician) makes her even more likable to me. It's great to read about a queen whose life has been a life of substance and example and that George III and her were happily married. Thank you for that great article, Black Queen

I found that picture on her wikipedia page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Queen_Charlotte_by_studio_of_Allan_Ramsay.jpg - she looked like a black albinos http://dybiz.com/sites_randomblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/sexy_black_albino_girl.jpg

Interesting...
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« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2011, 10:00:24 pm »

           Thank You for sharing that .. here is a list of her decendants..illegitimate ones too... you may recognise a few of them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Descendants_of_George_III_and_Queen_Charlotte

      
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/secret/famous/royalfamily.html

      is a very interesting read too.

Would a mod kindly merge this with my above post ..  thankyou


              http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/mar/12/race-monarchy

merged - Alex
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 10:20:45 pm by Alexandrine » Logged

Alexandrine
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« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2011, 10:20:09 pm »

If QC was black, who was her black ancestor? I thought she came from a royal lineage, I've read that theory a couple of times but that point is never clear to me.
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« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2011, 10:47:52 pm »

That's an interesting read Tatiana indeed  thankyou. Now whatever the truth...But her features instantly reminded me of a black albinos.

Alexandrine, did you mean having a black ancestor is not compatible with being from a royal lineage ?

African royals have always existed. They may not be as famous as the european but they are just as meaningful. Moreover, even before 50 BC there was already black people in europe. With the Moor invasion there was black nobility living in Europe who mixed with european noble families. So nothing exceptional with having a black ancestor somewhere... sigh
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« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2011, 11:05:48 pm »

I think if she had a black ancestor and it was known it would have been more talked about; like making a legend around the black princess who married the prince charming  tehe Being from a royal lineage means that her ancestors must be known until a certain point. Her bad looks probably are due to inbreeding.

I know that sometimes the european married royals from other continents but I don't think it was so usual. I've read about QEII being descedant of Mohammed but I don't give it much credibility.  dontknow

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« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2011, 11:17:05 pm »


It should be noted that the Royal Household itself, at the time of Queen Elizabeth II's coronation in 1952 referred to both her Asian and African bloodlines in an apologia it published defending her position as head of the Commonwealth.



http://factionparadox.wikia.com/wiki/Queen_Charlotte#Evidence_of_African_ancestry
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« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2011, 01:01:09 am »

I think if she had a black ancestor and it was known it would have been more talked about; like making a legend around the black princess who married the prince charming  tehe Being from a royal lineage means that her ancestors must be known until a certain point. Her bad looks probably are due to inbreeding.

I know that sometimes the european married royals from other continents but I don't think it was so usual. I've read about QEII being descedant of Mohammed but I don't give it much credibility.  dontknow

With due respect, she is not a black princess, but she seems to have black ancestry and it's not something to make a fuss or even an issue about it. If they didn't make a legend of it, it's because it was something common in their circle.
Before the trans-atlantic Slave trade and colonialist propaganda, it was something well-known and many historians like the french Fabre d'Olivet talked about that african heritage of most noble/royal european houses. Moreover time and assimilation took care to "hide" the african heritage.
I don't think she was not good looking  if it is what you implied. I do find her beautiful in her own way.
Like I said  before it's not because you're black that it means you're not from a royal lineage. African royalties had great empires before the ones we know now even existed and they have a different way to trace their genealogy than European family.
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« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2011, 04:06:01 am »

http://www.rastafarian.net/black_queen_of_england.htm
It quite a fascinating topic since its not really talked about, i never knew anything about her until i developed more of an interest in the BRF heck i didn't even know other RFs still existed living in this small island of mine. Surprised that they may have been not one but two a Black Queens of England---

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippa_of_Hainault
http://www.100greatblackbritons.com/bios/queen_phillipa.html
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Philippa was the daughter of William of Hainault, a lord in part of what is now Belgium. When she was nine the King of England, Edward II, decided that he would marry his son, the future Edward III, to her, and sent one of his bishops, a Bishop Stapeldon, to look at her. He described her thus:

"The lady whom we saw has not uncomely hair, betwixt blue-black and brown. Her head is cleaned shaped; her forehead high and broad, and standing somewhat forward. Her face narrows between the eyes, and the lower part of her face is still more narrow and slender than the forehead. Her eyes are blackish brown and deep. Her nose is fairly smooth and even, save that is somewhat broad at the tip and flattened, yet it is no snub nose. Her nostrils are also broad, her mouth fairly wide. Her lips somewhat full and especially the lower lip…all her limbs are well set and unmaimed, and nought is amiss so far as a man may see. Moreover, she is brown of skin all over, and much like her father, and in all things she is pleasant enough, as it seems to us."

Four years later Prince Edward went to visit his bride-to-be and her family, and fell in live with her. She was betrothed to him and in 1327, when she was only 14, she arrived in England. The next year, when she was 15, they married and were crowned King and Queen in 1330 when she was heavily pregnant with her first child and only 17.

This first child was called Edward, like his father, but is better known as the Black Prince. Many say that he was called this because of the colour of his armour, but there are records that show that he was called 'black' when he was very small. The French called him 'Le Noir'.

Philippa was a remarkable woman. She was very wise and was known and loved by the English for her kindliness and restraint. She would travel with her husband on his campaigns and take her children as well. When the King was abroad she ruled in his absence. Queen's College in Oxford University was founded under her direction by her chaplain, Robert de Eglesfield in 1341 when she was 28. She brought many artists and scholars from Hainault who contributed to English culture.

When she died, Edward never really recovered, and she was much mourned by him and the country. King Edward had a beautiful sculpture made for her tomb which you can see today at Westminster Abbey.

Considering their races it seems like speculation because its still heavily disputed  Hi
« Last Edit: December 12, 2011, 04:09:21 am by Black Queen » Logged
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« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2011, 12:45:49 pm »



With due respect, she is not a black princess, but she seems to have black ancestry and it's not something to make a fuss or even an issue about it. If they didn't make a legend of it, it's because it was something common in their circle.
Before the trans-atlantic Slave trade and colonialist propaganda, it was something well-known and many historians like the french Fabre d'Olivet talked about that african heritage of most noble/royal european houses. Moreover time and assimilation took care to "hide" the african heritage.
I don't think she was not good looking  if it is what you implied. I do find her beautiful in her own way.
Like I said  before it's not because you're black that it means you're not from a royal lineage. African royalties had great empires before the ones we know now even existed and they have a different way to trace their genealogy than European family.

I didn't mean her as the black princess but her ancestor, being from royal lineage means that her ancestors must be known and can be easily researched compare to the commoners in that era. Like for example the catalan royal family had turkish ancestors because a turkish princess married in and it's known about or their marriages with hungarian and polish wives.

what I cannot understand is if she had black ancestry it is never mentioned who the possible black ancestor was, imo it would be the first point to try to resolve not just say that she looked black.  dontknow As the theory is presented I don't get that they talk about a long ago ancestor but something very recent.

About her looks I have read a couple of books about the Windsors and they always mentioned her uglyness, it's not something I invented  cold but beauty is subjective  easter-egg-basket

Also I've never said that you can't have a royal lineage if you are black  huh
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« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2011, 06:07:00 pm »

Black Queen, like you said that's an interesting topic but not easy to talk about...

Alexandrine, be reassured I am not telling you said that as a black you can't have a royal lineage...I was asking if ever you meant it because of the way your sentence ideas were connected. I'm sorry if I made it sound that way  sorry
 
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About her looks I have read a couple of books about the Windsors and they always mentioned her uglyness, it's not something I invented   but beauty is subjective 

About her "ugliness", IMHO it was because she had "mulatto" features. it was said "Small and crooked, with a true Mulatto face." by the Baron Christian Stockmar who met Queen Charlotte and was like a member of the family.  And mulatto doesn't mean ugly like some may want to affirm it, it means being mixed. According to the criterias of that time, it was not what they would call a beauty and I guess it's still the case nowadays for many.

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I didn't mean her as the black princess but her ancestor, being from royal lineage means that her ancestors must be known and can be easily researched compare to the commoners in that era. Like for example the catalan royal family had turkish ancestors because a turkish princess married in and it's known about or their marriages with hungarian and polish wives.

What I mean is even though I agree with your points, in that case I don't think it applies. Recently there was a black woman descendant of slave who got married to one european prince from a discreet but well-known principality and nobody made a fuss about it and much don't even know she exists.
Now knowing how history is distorted and how it has always been an issue for european people to recognize any (blood) links with african people, except when it comes to place them on a lower position than themselves I don't see how they would be "proud" to tell about it. Even today, some black people still believe being fairer is a mark of power, so imagine at that time...they did encourage the hiding. It's already very difficult to find valuable infos about the time when the Moor were part of european society and even harder when Roman Emperors made deals with african kings...it's not a surprise they are not even mentionned.

So my logic tells me your example of the Turkish/hungarian/polish princesses cannot be valid in that case because hungarian/polish people are european/caucasian people and Turky was part of the Great Roman Empire in ancient times and so is historically part of Europe, even though it's still a subject of discord for many nowadays.

I remember what my french historian teacher told us about the period of the Moor invasion of Europe with their kings and princes coming from Africa and Middle-East and how after they ceased the war, some of them stayed and mixed with the local populations. I live in that part of the country by the way where their "heritage" is still there.
Even though their descendants have hidden the "african" identity of some of their ancestors it remains that there are still trace of them through the family/place names and some features that appear even centuries after. In my family we didn't mix with other "races" for long time but as we knew we had far away ancestors coming from middle-east it was no surprise to have members of the family having some of those features. It's simply genetics. I also wanted to add that even though they could have african/moor ancestry, it didn't mean they were not racists.

So most people not knowing about it, it's not an issue...it's not something they are confident/happy to affirm and history has shown that they know to hide things well.
 
Now that Queen Charlotte looked like a black albinos to me is something I won't change my mind about. I don't ask to be proved right nor wrong, it's just my personal feeling and I am not affirming anything as fact.  easter-wink
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« Reply #11 on: December 17, 2011, 11:08:32 pm »

http://www.rastafarian.net/black_queen_of_england.htm

I regret not learning more about her when i was younger she seems like a good role model to look up to...
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« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2011, 01:52:07 pm »

This was very interesting. There is no denying that she looks like a woman of mixed race. From the features, to the hair, and skin color...it makes me a believer in Mario Valdes. Additionally, I Googled some more photos of her, and she didn't look "ugly," like was stated. There were also some photos where the artist softened her features a bit.

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Recently there was a black woman descendant of slave who got married to one european prince from a discreet but well-known principality and nobody made a fuss about it and much don't even know she exists.


Mada, who was this person?  thankyou
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« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2011, 02:39:14 pm »

I tink she means Princess Angela of Liechtenstein  Hi
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« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2011, 06:13:52 pm »

Thank you Dahlia for answering Grace and Diana Fan's question ! That's the one I was thinking about.  thankyou
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« Reply #15 on: December 29, 2011, 10:17:08 pm »

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The Moors have traveled more up north than what people have been taught also interbreed with the collective in England as well as other houses up north Mainland & Islander. & this professor is a bit cocky about the black race when he would of been a slave or sold as one by the Moors. But eh whatever  legs
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« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2011, 08:03:55 am »

When the Moors (Muslims) Ruled Europe: Documentary (full)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PM8HnvuKbAo
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« Reply #17 on: December 31, 2011, 08:17:50 am »

I hope this answers as to why Char has Afro features.

Merg post please  flirt ran out of time
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« Reply #18 on: January 04, 2012, 09:37:56 pm »

Thank you D.I.R for posting those video links. It looks like insightful and I'll take a time to watch them !
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Even if you are in a minority of one. The truth is still the truth. An error does not become truth by reason of multiplied propagation, nor does truth become error because nobody will see it. Mahatma Gandi
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« Reply #19 on: January 05, 2012, 02:05:41 am »


            I will too ..  thankyou DIR
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