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Author Topic: Queen Victoria & Prince Albert  (Read 13750 times)
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FrederickLouis
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« Reply #160 on: July 11, 2018, 02:44:05 am »

Although Queen Victoria treated her staff well, she did not care for Prime Minister Gladstone. Often, she would remain standing so that he had to stand also, despite the fact that he was in his 80s.
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Little light
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« Reply #161 on: July 12, 2018, 01:24:03 am »

What a way to treat an old man. I feel we should treat others as we’d like to be treated.

But do you think FL that Victoria did this as he was ‘too independent minded’ and couldn’t be swayed by Victoria being Queen?

Or wS there always bad blood between them?
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FrederickLouis
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« Reply #162 on: July 13, 2018, 02:40:17 am »

Little light, I do not know if the Queen and Mr. Gladstone had any tension between them when they first became acquainted.
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« Reply #163 on: July 13, 2018, 03:36:27 am »

Queen Victoria didn't mind Gladstone when he was younger and Prince Albert was alive. Gladstone was an MP for a very long time, (since 1832.) It was only later, when he was so popular he was called 'the People's William' and he became Liberal Prime Minister several times that she grew to dislike him. She nicknamed him 'Merry Pebble'.

He was rather stiff with her. Victoria complained once that he treated her as 'if he was addressing a public meeting', and didn't butter her up or show much charm, unlike his rival Disraeli. Both the Queen and Gladstone were old when he came to take leave of her after leaving office for the last time. She gave him a photo of herself, but said sweetly that she would not offer him a peerage (a seat in the Lords') as she 'knew he would refuse it'.  So he got no title.
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FrederickLouis
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« Reply #164 on: July 14, 2018, 02:34:36 am »

In 1881 General Sir Henry Ponsonby kept a score card of the rows between Gladstone and Queen Victoria over events.
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« Reply #165 on: July 14, 2018, 07:20:16 pm »

You know, sometimes these people are talked about as 'giants' (extremely influential) in their filed. When they really are quite petty at times. (Aren't we all?!)

I always thought Queen Vic could be a bit petty at  times, but to act in such a way, refusing a seat in the House of Lords, was shocking.

To me, that's not the way a Head of State should be.

Thanks for posting FL.   flower
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FrederickLouis
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« Reply #166 on: July 18, 2018, 02:41:52 am »

On February 9, 1840, the day before their marriage, Prince Albert presented wedding gifts to Queen Victoria. These included four beautiful old fans.
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« Reply #167 on: July 21, 2018, 02:25:41 am »

Did Prince Albert, The Prince Consort have anything to do with the selection of Princess Alexandra of Denmark as a wife for his son, Prince Albert Edward?
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« Reply #168 on: July 21, 2018, 05:00:08 pm »

^ Extremely likely. Albert was the driving force behind Vic, in all matters.
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FrederickLouis
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« Reply #169 on: August 12, 2018, 02:46:18 am »

Prince Albert wrote to his brother, Ernest of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, on the birth of his daughter, Princess Victoria, in 1841, 'Albert, father of a daughter, you will laugh at me.'   
 easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol easter-lol
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« Reply #170 on: August 17, 2018, 02:39:17 am »

Queen Victoria congratulated Princess Louise of Prussia at her wedding in 1879.   
http://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-1879-the-graphic-queen-victoria-congratulates-princess-louise-of-prussia-167039861.html
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« Reply #171 on: September 01, 2018, 02:54:05 am »

Queen Victoria's last drive from Osbourne House 
http://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-1901-the-queen-victorias-last-drive-from-osbourne-house-167039780.html
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« Reply #172 on: October 17, 2018, 01:44:21 am »

Queen Victoria's years of marriage to Prince Albert had been ones in which she scarcely left her husband out of her sight. Her widowhood placed burdens on her younger daughters, since Victoria needed companionship.
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« Reply #173 on: October 21, 2018, 01:29:37 am »

In March 1887 Queen Victoria went to lay the first stone of the Medical Hall in London University. On May 4, 1887 she opened the Colonial and Indian Exhibition at South Kensington with a formal entourage.
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« Reply #174 on: November 09, 2018, 01:05:12 am »

Queen Victoria and Prince Albert honeymooned at Taymouth Castle at Kenmore in Perthshire. 
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-2908050
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« Reply #175 on: November 10, 2018, 07:00:43 am »

^^ That is a lovely castle. I can imagine it would have been so beautiful at the time.
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« Reply #176 on: November 10, 2018, 11:01:58 pm »

When Colonial Secretary Joseph Chamberlain suggested restricting the Diamond Jubilee's foreign guest list to the heads and representatives of the countries of the British Empire, Queen Victoria agreed to the idea.
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