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Author Topic: Queen Victoria & Prince Albert  (Read 5730 times)
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Rosella
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« Reply #120 on: June 09, 2017, 08:17:54 am »

^ Considering that no-one eligible for the title has had it withheld since at least as far back as the Hanovarians I think it's about a 100% certainty that William WILL be given the title Prince of Wales.
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« Reply #121 on: June 09, 2017, 08:26:05 am »

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« Reply #122 on: June 09, 2017, 10:31:32 am »

Off topic....
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FrederickLouis
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« Reply #123 on: June 10, 2017, 02:13:16 am »

Did Uncle Leopold visit them in England after Albert and Victoria married?
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« Reply #124 on: June 10, 2017, 03:28:21 am »

^ Yes Leopold did come to England on several occasions, bringing his second wife Queen Louise too. On one of the first visits he was named a godfather of Albert and Victoria's first child, Victoria (the future Empress Friedrich of Germany)and was present at the christening ceremony.
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« Reply #125 on: June 10, 2017, 03:47:31 am »

When I think of how her own mother treated her, I am disgusted; trying to rob her daughter of her birthright and basically subject her daughter to Conroy's abuse. Then having to put up with her mother's wheedling and BS and if I had been Victoria I would have had Conroy imprisoned.
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« Reply #126 on: June 10, 2017, 05:14:52 am »

On the occasion of Victoria's first Privy Council meeting Conroy wrote a note addressed to Victoria's first PM Lord Melbourne. He demanded, for past services, a peerage and a pension of £3,000 a year, more than a government minister of the time received! Melbourne called it 'impudent'.

As soon as she heard of this Victoria dismissed him from her Household. However, for the sake of peace and to prevent gossip about Victoria, Melbourne promised Conroy an Irish peerage in the future and a small pension. This proved to be a mistake, as Conroy remained in the Duchess of Kent's Household planning revenge and seething with resentment. He later spread gossip about the Queen. He never did get an Irish peerage but he and his family kept a scrapbook for years full of newspaper articles and cartoons showing Victoria in a bad light.

Victoria and her mother, the Duchess of Kent, were estranged for several years after she came to the Throne, but Albert, the Duchess of Kent's nephew, was fond of his aunt and eventually persuaded Victoria to forgive her. He seems to have thought that Conroy was a silver tongued blackguard and the Duchess had been duped by him into agreeing to his schemes. The Duchess became a vital part of the family circle and was a fond grandmother to Victoria's children.
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« Reply #127 on: June 11, 2017, 04:45:29 pm »

Queen Victoria was always a self-important little thing - she because impossible when Albert came on the scene. Don't know how he put up with her.
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Rosella
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« Reply #128 on: June 11, 2017, 05:27:29 pm »

^ But from Victoria's first pregnancy, and she had nine children altogether, Albert read the red boxes and plunged into government business. The monarchy had more real power in those days, less a ceremonial role, and Albert dealt with government ministers and consulted with them, alone and with his wife. He became an important part of national life, and knew all the political, scientific and artistic leaders within Britain. He was also very much head of the family, Victoria was consulted of course, but Albert had the final decision on their children's education and welfare. Victoria adored him and that's why she was so lost when he died, at only 42, after over 21 years of marriage. They had their moments of course, she was fiery tempered and he withdrew from conflict, but they were very happily married.
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« Reply #129 on: June 11, 2017, 08:34:40 pm »

Eating like a Queen: How 'greedy' Victoria's diet of cakes, calves heads and curry took her from a 7st bride to an 81-year-old who wore bloomers with a 50ins waist

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4592870/Queen-Victoria-s-diet-cakes-calves-heads-curry.html#ixzz4jixUheXG
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« Reply #130 on: June 12, 2017, 03:22:00 am »

By the time she died Victoria was enormous! Because she wasn't very tall she appeared nearly as wide as she was long, and it's said her coffin was almost square. Because she gobbled her food and it was protocol for people to stop eating when the Queen had finished, her Household rarely got a full meal. Once, at a banquet, the Duke of Devonshire was in the middle of eating and talking to the person next to him when a servant whisked the plate away. However, the Duke bellowed 'Oi, bring that back!' which he did. The Queen was very amused.

Victoria had a likeness for puddings and sweet confectionary. In her old age, when she complained once of feeling bloated, her doctors put her on a strict diet, with Berger's Invalid Food replacing some dishes. However, she ate the Invalid Food and the other food available as well! Nevertheless, she had a very strong constitution and died at 81, considered a great age in 1901.
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HRHOlya
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« Reply #131 on: August 05, 2017, 10:50:31 am »

Wrong thread for this, but Queen Victoria and Prince Albert slept together, he didn't have a separate bedroom, but about twenty years after his death Victoria received a minister in what had been Albert's dressing room at BP and as they sat talking he was amazed to see smoke rising from hot water that was laid out for Albert to shave. Not a thing had changed in that room since 1861, including laying out of clothing, lighting of lamps etc. A painted miniature of Albert was pinned to his pillow in the beds he shared with Victoria, and she sometimes clung to his nightshirt. It was the same in all the Royal residences. However, I don't think these rooms were kept as they were after Victoria's death.

You're right that they didn't keep it up! I looked it up and worte Little Light a pm, at the time it'd have been a double post and as YM pointed out, nothing to do with royal christening gowns, so I'm replying here!

This is what I wrote in my pm on keeping the room as is:

"I did a quick search and I was wrong on the count of the room still remaining unchanged, it was unchanged throughout Vic's life, but her son had the room refurbished and made it his study (though the rest of my comments were still true, incl my semi-rant on the Winds clinging to traditions that have been started recently in the sense that Vic& Al & Ed started these and they stick with them to this day unchanged; I mean they don't want to be called "German" but they celebrate Christmas the German way... only b/c Vic & Al did so! smh! [and many other things too]).
Oh and it's at Windsor Castle, not Balmoral, Albert died in Windsor Castle in the then Blue Room!

Here are two links that show the room then, one of them has longer explanations and pictures

http://godsandfoolishgrandeur.blogspot.de/2014/06/prince-albert-and-blue-room-windsor.html

https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/2100569/the-albert-room-windsor-castle "

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Rosella
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« Reply #132 on: August 05, 2017, 11:11:40 am »

^Thanks for that HRHOlya. Very interesting and love the photos/illustrations in the link. I think Victoria followed the German tradition of keeping rooms of the dead as they were in their inhabitants' lifetime, especially if they'd died there. I know Vicky, Vic and Albert's eldest child, was very taken aback to find, when she was a very young Princess of Prussia, several of these 'Death rooms' in a castle she had to inhabit. Must have been lovely by candlelight! Alexandra kept her older son, Prince Eddy's last bedroom like that for a little while after he died young, but that didn't last. Albert was everything to Victoria and she virtually canonised him.
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HRHOlya
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« Reply #133 on: August 05, 2017, 10:32:20 pm »

^ Never knew that was a German tradition! Kind of creepy, esp the "death rooms" at the castle! I understand in some cases leaving some things as were when someone passes away, I also understand parents keeping their kids' rooms for a while (like Alexandra did, thanks for the info), but several rooms like that is a bit much and worse still keeping these rooms for decades on end..
"Must have been lovely by candlelight"!! Yes so lovely I'd likely have weed myself if I were there one night!  tehe

The blue room looked lovely, I kind of found it a bit funny how the room had to be partly redone in total secrecy so Vic wouldn't notice as the room was partly rotting even...
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« Reply #134 on: August 06, 2017, 04:44:59 am »

^It's super creepy to me and too Miss Haversham for comfort.
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« Reply #135 on: August 18, 2017, 01:48:24 am »

Was the decade after Prince Albert's demise in 1861 a lost decade for Queen Victoria?
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« Reply #136 on: August 18, 2017, 03:25:14 am »

Why would it have been 'a lost decade'? Admittedly Victoria didn't go out in public that much in those years, though she resumed reviewing troops, attended a cousin's wedding, held courts for debutantes and others at BP. She still attended to her red boxes, still met, and on occasions argued with and reprimanded, her prime ministers and other ministers. She involved herself in awarding honours and approving appointments and in ministerial recommendations for posts, especially bishops and archbishops. The Queen strongly supported the Second Reform Bill which double the number of males on the electoral rolls. Her favourite Prime Minister Disraeli came into power in 1868.
 
Victoria engaged in matchmaking for her daughter Lenchen (Helena) and attended three of her children's weddings in the years following Albert's death. She made a big production of her grief at the Prince of Wales's nuptials, and Alice's wedding to Louis of Hesse was more like a funeral, but both of them then had separate establishments (Alice's in Germany) and she was happier at Helena's to Prince Christian of Schleswig Holstein (who looked more like the bride's grandfather) because the couple would be staying in England helping her. She gave the bride away. Hardly 'lost'.
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« Reply #137 on: August 18, 2017, 11:58:20 pm »

Please feel free to move this MODs. I don't know where this should go.

But on hot uk deals, a book on Queen Victoria is free on kindle for your iPad, kindle. It's a first come, first served basis so if you want to download it now and read it later, you would do well to download it now.

And I've no idea of the veracity of its contents either.

Here's the link

https://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/free-kindle-book-queen-victoria-a-life-from-beginning-to-end-kindle-edition-was-999-2768263

Also since this is a British site, non UK residents, I suppose, might not be eligible for this deal, but there might be one in your country.

Thank you MODs.
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HRHOlya
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« Reply #138 on: November 17, 2017, 11:43:50 pm »

What really killed Prince Albert? TV drama Victoria prompts fresh debate over his mysterious death aged 42

    The official cause on his death certificate is 'typhoid fever: duration 21 days'
    Yet a stunned public were sceptical over diagnosis as his illness was kept quiet
    There were no reported cases anywhere Albert visited 3 weeks before death
    University lecturer Dr Derek Gatherer considers the diagnosis and alternatives
    Experts have proposed he actually succumbed to a more modern affliction


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5093477/What-really-killed-Prince-Albert.html
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Rosella
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« Reply #139 on: November 18, 2017, 12:30:21 am »

Why would the public at the time have been sceptical? A ton of people in mid Victorian England (and all over the world) succumbed to disease and infection after very short illnesses at younger ages than Albert. The whole of the symptoms wouldn't have been published by the Royal doctors anyway. And nothing that I have read, and I've read loads on the Victorian period as I studied it at Uni and have for decades afterwards, suggests that people at the time were sceptical about typhoid as a cause of death for the Prince Consort.

It's only been in more recent times that the typhoid diagnosis has been challenged. The doctors in the Royal Household weren't exactly cutting edge, and for at least fifteen years I've read various modern medical authorities who are convinced that they got it wrong and Albert may have passed because of Krohn's decease or cancer of the stomach or several other ailments of the intestines like that. Albert did not have a strong constitution and for several months had had pain after meals and been chewing on the 19th century equivalent of antacid tablets. He'd also come home shortly before his last illness with a chill after going to Cambridge to tell the young Prince of Wales off about an affair with an actress.

On the other hand, the drains around Windsor were notorious and there had been cases of typhoid in the town around the time of Albert's death. I believe he may well have had symptoms of typhoid (and 19th century doctors, even stupid ones, were more likely to recognise the symptoms of typhoid than doctors nowadays) as well as something like Krohn's (untreatable in those days) and that's what carried him off at 42.
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