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Author Topic: Charles and his plants  (Read 1804 times)
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Snokitty
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« on: March 16, 2014, 11:20:20 pm »

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2582174/My-organic-garden-Highgrove-expensive-helps-heal-damaged-souls-says-Prince-Charles.html
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Prince Charles has admitted that critics may see his organic garden at Highgrove as an 'expensive indulgence', but insisted that it helps to heal 'damaged souls'.

Launching an outspoken attack on the 'short-sighted' destruction of rare plants, fruit and vegetables, he defended the care and money he has lavished on the grounds of his country estate in Gloucestershire.

Since buying Highgrove in 1980, Charles has transformed its once drab gardens by planting unusual British varieties of apples, restoring a wild flower meadow and allowing only natural fertilisers to be used.

He said he saw his efforts as a reaction to the 'carnage of fashionable vandalism' that has left many once common shrubs, trees and farm animals on the endangered list.

Writing in a foreword to a new book about his estate, the 65-year-old Prince said: 'In many ways the garden at Highgrove represents one very small attempt to heal the appallingly short-sighted damage done to the soil, the landscape and to our own souls.
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AnaBolena
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« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2014, 05:23:46 pm »

^ I talk to my plants.  Lips Sealed Embarrassed Lips Sealed

My husband and I ran a test - I talked and sung to my plants and he ignored his - mine are prize orchids - his are sad looking and now receiving my care.  loveshower
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gingerboy24
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« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2014, 07:32:11 pm »

I talk to my plants too, not sure they listen though, but they are doing well.
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Dasher
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2014, 07:44:15 pm »

What emotional vegetation, what next?

Knock knock!
Who's there?
Leaf?
Leaf who?
Leaf me alone!  flower

"When a South African botanist Lyall Watson claimed in 1973 that plants had emotions that could be recorded on a lie detector test, he was dismissed by many in the scientific community".
Apparently plants not only respond to sound, but they also communicate to each other by making "clicking" sound.


And I thought it was all in my imagination!   laugh



http://www.medicaldaily.com/scientists-confirm-plants-talk-and-listen-each-other-communication-crucial-survival-240775
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Snokitty
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« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2014, 02:44:34 pm »

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-2591482/Prince-Charles-exclusive-My-glorious-Highgrove-garden.html
Quote
Prince Charles has spent more than three decades creating the magnificent garden at Highgrove, his 18th-century country house in Gloucestershire. As we begin an exclusive two-week series following a gardening year there, he reveals what inspired him

I find it hard to believe that I have been at Highgrove for 34 years. During that time I have tried to enhance the landscape and the setting of the house; I have tried to create a structure and a framework through the judicious use of hedges, avenues and topiary. Half the battle about making a garden is to ensure there is something interesting to look at in the winter months, so geometrical shapes and patterns help a great deal – particularly when viewed from the windows of the house. Long shadows cast by avenues and hedges in the winter sun are, to my mind, an essential, rewarding feature of a garden set in its landscape.

I suppose, when I think about it, I have gardened to a certain extent from a painter’s perspective. Each part of the garden is a separate ‘painting’ and the result of ceaseless walking, ruminating and observing those moments of magic when the light becomes almost dreamlike in its illuminating intensity. It is in those moments when you are lost in wonder that such beauty is possible and inspiration can come in terms of the positioning of new plantings of trees, shrubs and flowers or, for that matter, of architectural features that catch the eye.

I think I learnt quite quickly that placing anything in a garden can easily go wrong if you rush at it, so I have tried never to force a plan or design, but to wait for an ‘intuitive’ idea to form itself when the moment is right. I have found this of particular value when agonising over where to place pieces of sculpture, for instance. I have been most fortunate over the years to have been given all sorts of things by a succession of generous individuals, organisations, societies, craftsmen and sculptors and it has often taken several years before their correct setting dawned on me.
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mrharrywales
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« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2014, 03:09:28 am »

I think he uses his gardens as his therapy, once he can spill his problems to the plants as much as he wants and he will be sure they won't be telling anyone...
hehehe
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cate1949
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« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2014, 03:13:37 am »

well my garden is not Highgrove class - but I love it - devote myself to it - and use organic stuff
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